Soon Kueh

Soon Kueh – 笋粿

Soon Kueh is a popular Teochew snack that can be found in most hawker centres. It was originally made with bamboo shoots, Chinese turnip, dried Chinese mushrooms and dried shrimps for the “umami”. To simplify the dish, we decided to leave out bamboo shoots.

Dry Bak Kut Teh – 干肉骨茶

If you’re looking to give mummy dearest a treat for Mother’s Day, this sumptuous treat of Dry Bak Kut Teh would be a great choice! Most of us are familiar with the soupy version of BKT, but how about trying it out a tantalizing dry version?

Grilled Shrimp On Lemongrass Skewers – 香茅虾串

We love food on skewers. The taste of sweet tender meat char grilled to perfection and still very juicy in center. But, what holds us back is quite tedious to do it at home. We came up with this super easy grilled shrimp lemongrass skewers that you can be replicate at home in a jiffy using Knife brand Thai Dipping sauce. The spicy sour sweet flavour of the sauce enhances the sweetness of the prawn meat. The lemongrass skewers imparts its subtle fragrance to another level. Serve it with a small bowl of the Thai Dipping sauce. Delish to the max!

Egg Foo Yong – 芙蓉蛋

It’s all about the egg, all about the egg!! Our Foo Yong omelette is fried beautifully till its edges and bottom crisps and fluffs up yet the centre remains moist and soft.

We added Char siew and prawns to give it a sweet smoky taste. You can add anything and everything in it, that how versatile this dish is!

Wing Beans With Minced Pork – 翼豆炒猪肉

The Meatmen Hae Bee Hiam was so delicious, that we started thinking of ways to cook it. We love the crunchiness and freshness of Wing Beans. Wing Beans are best paired with chili, they compliment each other.

You may substitute Wings Beans with Chinese Brinjal, long beans or even petai.Meat can be substituted with your favourite seafood. The only ingredient you can’t substitute is The Meatmen Hae Bee Hiam. There is a spice in it that heightens the taste of this dish!!

Hae Bee Hiam – 蝦米香

Hae Bee Hiam,is a perfect marriage of dried shrimps and spices. Its spicy, salty, a tinge of sourness with a lingering umami taste to tease the palate. It’s a popular condiment in Singapore and Malaysia. Some hardcore lovers have it with just steamed hot white rice or simple plain porridge, or even toast.