Bubur Pulut Hitam - 黑糯米

Bubur Pulut Hitam – 黑糯米

Bubur Pulut Hitam originated from Indonesia, and has been fondly adopted as a local dessert in Singapore and Malaysia. In old days, black rice was nicknamed “forbidden rice” because, as you probably guessed it, it was reserved for the blue-blooded. Fortunately, as our societies became modern and affluent, these dishes have become available for us to share and enjoy. Although mostly used to decorate dishes today, you can savour its health benefits in the form of this unassuming delicious little dessert – made easy!

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Cantonese Bak Chang – 广式肉粽

Ending off our Dragonboat festival food series with the umami in the super-fragrant Cantonese Bak Chang! The Cantonese Bak Chang is chock-a-block with savoury goodness. Our version features eight different types of ingredients for its filling, including luscious chunks of pork belly marinated with eight condiments, and of course mung beans – the traditional must-have […]

Nyonya Bak Chang - 娘惹粽

Nyonya Bak Chang – 娘惹粽

The Nyonya Bak Chang is a fragrant, sweet-salty iteration of the Bak Chang created by the Peranakan people – it combines marinated pork, candied wintermelon and steamed mushrooms to achieve the wonderful blend of flavours you get with every bite. Our version uses lean pork shoulder meat instead of the fatty pork in traditional rice dumplings, as well as cekur root, or sand ginger, that gives the meat a more intense flavour that goes oh-so-well with the lightly salted glutinous rice.

Kee Chang - 碱水粽

Kee Chang – 碱水粽

Dragonboat Festival – it’s the season for drums, dragonboats and of course, changs of every kind. What started out as simple, plain glutinous rice dumplings now has many variations – some savoury with salted egg yolks and braised meat, and others sweet with red bean or lotus bean pastes.

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Muah Chee – 麻糍

Making muah chee in 15 minutes? At home? It may sound preposterous but using a microwave is easy. Its is a traditional snack sold in night markets or now, in food courts. It’s a childhood favourite. Sticky springy pillowy soft mua chee coated with sweet ground roasted peanuts or sweetened black sesame. The best way to eat it is using a toothpick to spear it and pop into one’s mouth.

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Ondeh Ondeh – 椰糖椰丝球

A classic Malay kueh with such a cute name like ondeh ondeh. We would be crazy to leave this out! Imagine QQ (chewy) glutinous rice balls oozing with Gula Melaka (palm sugar) and coated with fresh coconut shreds.

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Bak Chang – 肉粽

Bak Chang (also known as 粽子) is a dish that many of us here love. Though there are plenty of popular stalls in Singapore, its origins are from China. Bak Chang is most popularly eaten during the Duan Wu Festival, which happens this weekend.